Cine-equipment

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MACHINES


Cameras, projectors and other motion picture equipment highlighted in the texts are listed here, with the inventor or engineer and/or promoter associated with the machine given in parentheses. Click on the images for higher resolution copies. Biograph (Herman Casler) The Biograph projector for large format 68/70 mm film, 1896. Intermittent film movement was by friction rollers. Hendricks Collection/Smithsonian Institution

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Biographe (Georges Demenÿ) Originally known as the Chronophotographe, Demenÿ's camera was commercially available from Gaumont from 1896, as the Biographe, using unperforated 60 mm film.

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Biokam (Alfred Darling-Alfred Wrench) Complete system (motion camera, projector/printer; and stills camera) for 17.5 mm centre-perforated film, intended for the amateur and semi-professional market in 1899

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Bioscope (Charles Urban) Warwick Bioscope, c1900. Designed in the USA for Urban by Walter Isaacs in 1897 and sold in Britain, this projector used a beater movement

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Bioskop (Max Skladanowsky) Projector that used two loops of 54 mm film, with images projected alternately, 1895

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Birtac (Birt Acres) The Birtac narrow gauge camera / printer / projector for 17.mm film, set up for projection

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Chronophotographe (Georges Demenÿ/Léon Gaumont) Beater-movement projector for 58 mm / 60 mm film

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Cieroscope (Richard Appleton) Appleton's Cieroscope, as advertised in 1899

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Cinematograph (Robert Royou Beard) R.R. Beard cinematograph projector with Maltese cross mechanism, c1897. Operated by Will Day, c1930.

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Cinematograph (Cecil Wray) 35 mm film projection mechanism with claw movement. A version was sold from 1896 by Riley

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Cinematograph (Alfred Wrench) Wrench cinematograph projector, 1898 model. The Wrench featured an unusual rachet and pawl mechanism, and could also show lantern slides

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Cinématographe (Auguste Lumière-Louis Lumière) 1. Lumière Cinématographe in use as a camera c.1896 (with unusual film take-up chamber)

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Cinématographe (Auguste Lumière-Louis Lumière) 2. Lumière Cinématographe set up for projection, 1895-96

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Cinéorama (Raoul Grimoin-Sanson) Ten synchronised cameras arranged in a circle filmed a balloon ascent from the balloon basket. The intention was that ten projectors would recreate the experience on a circular screen

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Electrical Schnellseher (Ottomar Anschütz) Coin-operated arcade version, with images on celluloid arranged around a disc, c1892

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Electrotachyscope (Ottomar Anschütz) Early version, with glass positives arranged around a disc, 1887

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Electrotachyscope (projecting) (Ottomar Anschütz) Drawing showing two large picture discs, each with twelve images, projected alternately, 1894

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Filoscope (Henry Short) A flip-book, patented in 1898, encased in a metal cover and operated by applying thumb pressure on a lever. Featuring lithographed images, mostly from films made by R.W. Paul

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Kammatograph (Leo Kamm) Camera / projector with miniature images arranged in a spiral on a glass disc, patented 1898

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Kineoptoscope (Riley Brothers) 35 mm film projector with claw movement, based on Wray's design. Free-standing model, 1897

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Kinesigraph (Wordsworth Donisthorpe) Camera for unperforated film, unusual shuttle movement, patented with W.C. Crofts 1889

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Kinetic Camera (Birt Acres) Birt Acres' Kinetic Camera for 35mm perforated film, 1895

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Kinetograph (George De Bedts) De Bedts Kinetograph, 1896. A combined camera-projector mechanism. Illustrated in projection mode, with water tank cooler between light source and film

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Kinetograph (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) Camera (the first to use perforated film stock) for producing subjects for the Kinetoscope peepshow machine. Developed over several years, and shotting commercially-used films from 1893

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Kinetophone (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) Kinetoscope with Phonograph cylinder audio player built in and earphones, 1895

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Kinetoscope (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) 1. Kinetoscope - interior view. The 35 mm film travelled continuously over a bank of rollers, each picture being viewed briefly through a narrow slot in the revolving shutter

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Kinetoscope (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) 2. Kinetoscope - exterior view. Electrically-driven peepshow machine for films produced with Kinetograph camera. 1894

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Kinetoscope (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) 3. Peter Bacigalupi's Kinetoscope parlour, San Francisco, 1894 or 1895

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Kinetoscope (W.K-L. Dickson-Thomas Edison) 4. Kinetoscope plan view, showing continuous film mechanism and single thin aperture in shutter

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Kinora (Herman Casler-Louis Lumière) The first clockwork Kinora mechanism, as manufactured by Gaumont


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Magniscope (Edward Amet) Amet Magniscope 35mm film projector, 1896. A portable machine popular with travelling showmen. © American Museum of the Moving Image

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Mutagraph (Herman Casler) Mutagraph-Biograph camera for 68/70 mm film, c1897

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Mutoscope (Herman Casler) Hand-cranked viewer for exhibiting a reel of photographs printed from a motion picture film. Commercialised 1896

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Panoptikon (Woodville Latham) Primitive projector, in which the two-inch film moved continuously. The first to be used for commercial film shows in 1895. Later (as the Eidoloscope) an intermittent mechanism was added

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Phantascope (C. Francis Jenkins) Beater movement version used in October 1895

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Phantascope (J.A.A. Rudge) Phantascope (or Biphantascope), 1870s. Seven slides were mounted in a carousel that travelled around the lantern body intermittently

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Phonoscope (Georges Demenÿ) Phonoscope (Gaumont-Demenÿ) - also known as the Bioscope - set up for projection, 1895

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Photo-Rotoscope (W.C. Hughes) Hughes Photo-Rotoscope projector, 1898, with beater movement

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Praxinoscope (Émile Reynaud) 1877, version with crank handle

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Projecting Kinetoscope (Thomas Edison) Edison Projecting Kinetscope with spoolbank, 1897

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Tachyscope (Ottomar Anschütz) Drum version of the Anschütz Tachyscope (also known as the Schnellseher), 1890. Showed five sets of moving images simultaneously. Transparencies were continuously moving, each illuminated by a brief spark.

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Thaumatographe (Oskar Messter) Messter Thaumtographe camera for 35 mm film, 1896

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Théâtre Optique (Émile Reynaud) A theatrical projection version of Reynaud's Praxinoscope, using a band of painted characters superimposed on a background projected from a separate lantern. Patented 1888, in commercial use from 1892. Later, photographic images were used

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Theatrograph (Robert Paul) The Theatrograph no. 2, mark 1, as presented by Robert Paul to the Science Museum in 1913

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Vitascope (Thomas Armat-Thomas Edison) Vitascope 35 mm film projector, originally developed by Thomas Armat (with C. Francis Jenkins), and sold to Edison, 1896

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Zoöpraxiscope (Eadweard Muybridge) Muybridge's Zoöpraxiscope, 1879 (modified 1892/3). © 2004 Kingston Museum and Heritage Centre, Surrey


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